We Asked Your Arc Board Candidates The Same Five Questions

By Alicia D’Arcy, Features Sub-Editor

On 1–4 May, elections are open via email for the election of four new board directors to Arc, UNSW’s student union. Two of these elected directors must be women and, if successful, candidates would have a term of two years. Arc is worth just under $11 million and has approximately 31,000 members. Board directors’ primary responsibility is the strategic direction of Arc and, importantly, they don’t actually manage its day to day operations. Rather, they approve, reject or refine recommendations made to the board by Arc management, and they collaboratively work with management in this process.

The Tharunka Charter mandates that “Representations/images of candidates for any of the Arc elections shall not be included in Tharunka in the four weeks leading up to [it].” Due to this, and in order to ensure fairness, each candidate has been asked the same five questions to which we have not provided any commentary. Their non-edited responses are below:

Mia Carey

Fine Arts/Arts, 3rd year

 

  1. What is the number one legacy you want to leave after your term on Arc Board?

 

It would be in my greatest interests to instigate and oversee a vast improvement of accessibility and awareness for students who are in need of welfare and wellbeing services. This is something which I will be giving credence to on Arc Board, especially with Trimester’s drastic changes that will affect all students.

 

  1. What sets you apart from the other candidates?

 

This is my third year of having experience of being involved on both the Art & Design campus and the Kensington campus. That means I am able to understand, more holistically, the needs of the students and am able to apply this knowledge empirically to Arc Board.

 

  1. Being on a Board of an organisation as large as Arc is difficult and requires competence. What makes you qualified to do this job?

 

I believe the best and most effective qualification that can be brought into an Arc Board role is the behaviour in which one composes themselves. My attitude towards the Board director’s position is one which is open and willing to learn, assertive, to be grounded by critical thinking and to maintain a high standard of work which, above all else, values the student’s needs.

 

  1. Board directors may only approve, reject, refine or collaboratively work on recommendations made to the board by management; they do not manage the day to day operations. How do you resolve this fact with your policy platform?

 

By being elected based on policy platforms means that when recommendations are presented by management, I will question how these changes would correlate with what I have set out to achieve for the students and make decisions based off those principles.

 

  1. Do you have any political affiliations or have you ever been a part of any political organisation on campus or otherwise?

 

I find that I am not a person who will sit quietly on issues that have significance to my values such as welfare, education and the equity of women. I participate in politics that is left wing for this reason and that extends to involvement on campus.

 

 

Emily Casey

As of this morning, Emily has now withdrawn from the election.

 

 

Millie Chen

Commerce/Law, 4th year

 

  1. What is the number one legacy you want to leave after your term on Arc Board?

 

I’d like to successfully encourage international students to voice out more frequently and confidently.

 

I also like to leave the spirit of open minded, transparency and zero tolerance on discrimination.

 

  1. What sets you apart from the other candidates?

 

I had been executives for twice and president for once in two different student societies which are mainly formed by international students. Comparing to other candidates, I understand international students’ needs and expectations better.

 

  1. Being on a Board of an organisation as large as Arc is difficult and requires competence. What makes you qualified to do this job?

 

I think it would be my past experience as student leaders for more than 14 years. Also, my skills developed from previous university study in multitasking, negotiation and analysis would add points to my position.

 

  1. Board directors may only approve, reject, refine or collaboratively work on recommendations made to the board by management; they do not manage the day to day operations. How do you resolve this fact with your policy platform?

 

Day to day operations are important to process my policies development however as a board member, I would stick to the board policy and use the platform provided to get the most vote on my policies.

 

  1. Do you have any political affiliations or have you ever been a part of any political organisation on campus or otherwise?

 

I’m involved with Student Unity on campus.

 

 

Amy Colville

Arts/Law, 4th year

 

  1. What is the number one legacy you want to leave after your term on Arc Board?

 

I don’t want to have one! If Arc is working well people wont be thinking about the students who are on the Board making it all happen.

 

  1. What sets you apart from the other candidates?

 

Attention to detail. Being on Arc Board involves auditing and generally scrutinising what Arc is doing and where money is flowing, so being detail oriented is pretty valuable.

 

  1. Being on a Board of an organisation as large as Arc is difficult and requires competence. What makes you qualified to do this job?

 

I’ve been involved with three clubs and societies while at UNSW. Although I’ve only held leadership roles in one, it has given me an insight into how to ensure a club is running well and communicates well with the students it serves.

 

  1. Board directors may only approve, reject, refine or collaboratively work on recommendations made to the board by management; they do not manage the day to day operations. How do you resolve this fact with your policy platform?

 

My main platform is to advocate for continued improvements to Arc services – this is big picture and I’ve never promised to bring in a particular program/event/service. I also trust that Arc staff will listen to the Board’s recommendations and create something that functions well on the ground as the have been doing up until this point.

 

  1. Do you have any political affiliations or have you ever been a part of any political organisation on campus or otherwise?

 

Yes. The Labor Party off campus and the UNSW Labor Club on campus.

 

 

Nadhirah Daud

Arts/Law, 4th year

 

  1. What is the number one legacy you want to leave after your term on Arc Board?

 

I want for my legacy on Board to involve the promotion of and support for long-term programs which increase the participation of lower socioeconomic status, international and indigenous students in university life. I anticipate these programs to look like development skills and leadership workshops, as well as innovative social events and activities targeted at students from these backgrounds.

 

  1. What sets you apart from the other candidates?

 

My experience in serving in numerous executive roles where I have helped develop strategies and activities for maximising extra-curricular participation allows me to offer innovative and diverse perspectives on how to improve the student experience. Having also benefited from Arc programs through my previous participation in Shack Tutoring, I also have an understanding of what students seek to gain from Arc activities and can bridge the gap between strategy and application to ensure students gain the most from investing time in Arc initiatives.

 

  1. Being on a Board of an organisation as large as Arc is difficult and requires competence. What makes you qualified to do this job?

 

Having served as a councillor on the Student Representative Council in 2016, a student representative on the Law Faculty board this year, and on various executives in the UNSW Law Society and Debating Society throughout university, I believe I have the extensive experience required to competently represent the voice and interests of students. My experience in consulting students, in formulating strategies for inclusivity as a previous Women’s Officer for the Debating Society, and the time management skills I have gained through juggling these responsibilities over the years makes me especially qualified to manage the onerous task of sitting on Board and critically thinking about how to improve campus life.

 

  1. Board directors may only approve, reject, refine or collaboratively work on recommendations made to the board by management; they do not manage the day to day operations. How do you resolve this fact with your policy platform?

 

Since the role of Board Directors is to focus on strategy rather than the operational side of their implementation, my policy platform is aimed at asking the right questions to generate the types of programs and events that are likely to result in the outcomes desired by Board. Furthermore, the ability to collaboratively work on recommendations and to critically assess activities undertaken by Arc through my platform of accountability ensures student funds are best used to maximise positive outcomes for all students.

 

  1. Do you have any political affiliations or have you ever been a part of any political organisation on campus or otherwise?

 

I am running on an independent platform in this election and have never been a part of any political organisation on campus or otherwise.

 

 

Josh Li

  1. What is the number one legacy you want to leave after your term on Arc Board?

 

For UNSW to evolve into a festive campus for all students, where amazing free events are always on and just relaxing with friends is easier to enjoy. Also, to guarantee that student life will thrive with the transition into Trimesters and the new Roundhouse.

 

  1. What sets you apart from the other candidates?

 

As a student of Engineering and Science, I trust that I can better improve student life for everyone in these faculties because of our similar experiences. Being a first year I am also more determined to improve our student life immediately, because of a willingness to create a better UNSW for future years to come.

 

  1. Being on a Board of an organisation as large as Arc is difficult and requires competence. What makes you qualified to do this job?

 

From lots of experience organising events with numerous societies and Arc volunteering, as well as a willingness to learn and discover completely new ideas. I am well prepared for how to handle all the challenges that this position will hold and look forward most to having the opportunity to improve Arc for students.

 

  1. Board directors may only approve, reject, refine or collaboratively work on recommendations made to the board by management; they do not manage the day to day operations. How do you resolve this fact with your policy platform?

 

For me, my policy platform is to evolve student life into being amazing, I trust this can be done through working to the highest standard with management on all cases. For areas that need to be improved quickly, I will hold it as my first priority to complete with the board, in order to protect the quality of student life at UNSW.

 

  1. Do you have any political affiliations or have you ever been a part of any political organisation on campus or otherwise?

 

I have not been a part of any political organisation both on campus and otherwise because, I hope to base decisions off facts and really do not want to be clouded by political bias.

 

 

Jack McNally

Arts/Law, 2nd year

 

  1. What is the number one legacy you want to leave after your term on Arc Board?

 

Leaving Arc, I would hope that my legacy would be ensuring all students have access to sexual and mental health services, and legal and advocacy services on campus. These services are incredibly important, and access to them will not only improve the university experience of students, but will ensure that they are safe, healthy and that their welfare is catered for.

 

  1. What sets you apart from the other candidates?

 

I’m an experienced student advocate, having served on the UNSW SRC, been heavily involved in the 891 buses campaign and working with students to promote and create welfare initiatives such as weekly Free Breakfast and a submission to a Senate Inquiry on how Centrelink cuts affect students. I think this level of experience will allow me to go in to bat for students and ensure that they are receiving the best possible student experience from the get-go on Arc Board.

 

  1. Being on a Board of an organisation as large as Arc is difficult and requires competence. What makes you qualified to do this job?

 

I don’t think anyone can say that they will the perfect Board Director, or that they will know how to run a company from day one; after all, we’re still students. But what I have is passion and a willingness to learn from past and present Board Directors, and to professionally develop myself, and dedication to ensuring that Arc provides the best services and best experiences for students.

 

  1. Board directors may only approve, reject, refine or collaboratively work on recommendations made to the board by management; they do not manage the day to day operations. How do you resolve this fact with your policy platform?

 

Many of my policies – such as more Arc-owned venues on campus and funding the fight against trimesters – line up with Arc’s mission and goal to be a strategic body to point the organisation in the right direction to ensure that the best student experience is always achieved. I would work with the CEO of Arc, and other Board Directors, to communicate my ideas and my platform; because I think my policies will genuinely ensure that Arc is providing the best possible student experience and will make a real difference in students’ lives.

 

  1. Do you have any political affiliations or have you ever been a part of any political organisation on campus or otherwise?

 

I engage in left-wing political groups and the SRC in my advocacy work on campus, and collaboratively work with students from all political persuasions to try and advance the issues that matter most to students, like trimesters, the 891 buses and student welfare issues.

 

Samuel Westley

Arts and Business/Law, 4th year

 

  1. What is the number one legacy you want to leave after your term on Arc Board?

 

The number one legacy I want to leave after my term on Arc Board is to make the organisation more financially transparent. I want students to be able to have an understanding of how much SRC representatives and Arc Board directors are paid each year as well as whether or not budgetary allocations are in alignment with their needs as students.

 

  1. What sets you apart from the other candidates?

 

As distinct from 6 out of the 9 candidates running for Arc Board this year, I will not be engaging in a ‘preference deal’; I am running independently and will aim to represent a cross-section of student interests on Arc board. Furthermore, my policy proposals are distinguishable because they are achievable and practical.

 

  1. Being on a Board of an organisation as large as Arc is difficult and requires competence. What makes you qualified to do this job?

 

Having served in 2015 as a Justice of the Peace Volunteer with the ‘Justices of the Peace League’ team in Arc, in 2016-2017 as a Peer Mentor for the Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences Peer Mentoring Program, in 2017 as an enthusiastic member of the UNSW Latin Dance Society, in 2017 as a Public Interest Careers Director in the UNSW Law Society and in 2015-2017 as a student volunteer at Western Sydney Community Legal Centre I believe I have the skills, passion and the grit necessary to competently serve on Arc. My involvement across all facets of university life will allow me to provide a representative perspective on Arc Board.

 

  1. Board directors may only approve, reject, refine or collaboratively work on recommendations made to the board by management; they do not manage the day to day operations. How do you resolve this fact with your policy platform?

 

My policy platform is underpinned by two core values that are applicable to the duties of Arc Board directors; pursuing transparency and strengthening consultation. By applying these principles to my work on Arc Board, I believe I will be able to successfully implement my policy platform.

 

  1. Do you have any political affiliations or have you ever been a part of any political organisation on campus or otherwise?

 

I’m standing as an independent because Arc is an organisation for all university students, especially those who don’t have a voice and aren’t engaged in the political process. I believe an alternative approach taken would hinder, not enhance the capacity for Arc Board to achieve its strategic objectives.

 

 

Jason Zabakly

Arts/Education, 4th year

 

  1. What is the number one legacy you want to leave after your term on Arc Board?

 

Arc is an amazing organisation! But, along with my running mates Amy and Millie, I hope to leave Arc in a better financial state so that it can better provide students with services, opportunities and fun.

 

  1. What sets you apart from the other candidates?

 

What really differentiates me from other candidates is just the breadth of my involvement at UNSW From being the President of the Model United Nations Society, Founding president of the Middle Eastern Food and Culture society, member of the highly prestigious Yellow Shirts program and even my involvement in revue.

 

  1. Being on a Board of an organisation as large as Arc is difficult and requires competence. What makes you qualified to do this job?

 

As a fourth year with plenty of leadership, organisation and communication experience I believe I have progressed and developed as a person to a point which would allow me to engage with Arc and adhere to the competences and difficulties faced with being a member of the organisation.

 

  1. Board directors may only approve, reject, refine or collaboratively work on recommendations made to the board by management; they do not manage the day to day operations. How do you resolve this fact with your policy platform?

 

My policy outlines the sort of initiatives I would be interested in and which I believe the broader UNSW community need. These sorts of high profile elections allow for coverage of these policies allowing Management to consider them. If any policies outlined in my platform are put forward to board I will put my full support behind them

 

  1. Do you have any political affiliations or have you ever been a part of any political organisation on campus or otherwise?

 

A member of the Labor party.